COMPASSION IS WHAT SUSTAINS ME: CAROL COTTRILL

It seems so fitting that Carol Cottrill’s medical specialty is the hearts of children - both physical and emotional. Her career path began when her 4th child was born with congenital heart disease.  Growing up on a family farm, she learned to balance compassion and necessity, a skill she would use in caring for her daughter and later during 18 years as medical director of UK’s pediatric ICU. Her daughter’s illness introduced her to wonderfully compassionate doctors and nurses who….

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FRIEND TO THOSE WHO ARE AILING: DANESH MAZLOOMDOOST, MD

Danesh Mazloomdoost, MD has inherited a tradition reflected in his name itself. In his family’s native Iran, Mazloomdoost means “friend to those who are ailing.” His life in medicine seems almost preordained by his family history. His father (a U.S. trained anesthesiologist who specialized in pain management) and mother (who trained in anesthesiology in Iran and retrained in psychiatry in the U.S.) built their practice around a comprehensive mind-body approach to pain management, long before such….

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SUSTAINING AN ALTRUISTIC SPIRIT: TERRY BARRETT

Terry Barrett is Chief of the Gastroenterology Division of the Department of Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine. He came to Lexington in 2013 from Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago.  Becoming a Doctor.   Although there were no doctors in his family, he always felt a parental expectation of excellence and high achievement. He had a poor impression of the competitive nature of pre-medical education he witnessed among his peers.

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pediatric cardiology fellow and calls Cottrill ‘my second mom.’ Ed Todd, retired cardiac surgeon, longtime colleague and friend says ‘she’s the closest thing to a saint I’ve ever known.’


Cottrill uses a wheelchair now due to the pain from spinal surgery and severe arthritis. Despite this, she makes regular mission trips to South America to provide cardiac consultation. In the process of this selfless service, she continues to be sustained by the mutual compassionate interactions with professional colleagues, her young patients and their families.

 It seems so fitting that Carol Cottrill’s medical specialty is the hearts of children - both physical and emotional. Her career path began when her 4th child was born with congenital heart disease.


Growing up on a family farm, she learned to balance compassion and necessity, a skill she would use in caring for her daughter and later during 18 years as medical director of UK’s pediatric ICU. Her daughter’s illness introduced her to wonderfully compassionate doctors and nurses who cared for sick children as their life’s work.


When her daughter died after Cottrill’s first year of medical school, she felt isolated from her classmates, who did not know how to talk to her about death, dying, loss and grief. She finally took the initiative, reached out to them and felt comforted.


She learned how to practice compassionate medicine more from relationships with classmates and patients than from the formal medical curriculum. She says, ‘whether it’s a fellow student or a patient, you have to become human to one another. People need to know you’re on their side. You do that with compassion. Compassion is when we both put a part of ourselves out there and we somehow touch one another.’


Cottrill worries about our growing reliance on technology. ‘If you are looking at a computer instead of a patient’s eyes, both of you are missing something important. Doctors need to be refueled. You can’t go at a tremendous pace and not get something back.

BY JOHN A. PATTERSON MD, MSPH, FAAFP

I am refueled by what patients give back to me. Compassion is what sustains me.’


She believes compassion flows in both directions and needs to be cultivated in medical training to enrich the doctor-patient relationship and the quality of physicians’ lives. ‘Patients will give you compassion but you have to first give yourself to them. Practicing medicine without compassion is drudgery- just putting in your time. Neither you nor the patient is psychologically benefited and such physicians are apt to abandon the profession.’


Just as she learned compassion from her loving family and the kind nuns in Catholic school, she believes medical students and residents need to see compassion modeled by their teachers in medicine. Her ICU conversations with parents of dying children always included a resident so they could learn how to communicate with compassion.


Her office staff says, ‘She can calm a crying child better than we can. She gives us a shoulder to cry on after a hard day.’ She gives gas money to poor parents. She has taken into her home, and even adopted, children in desperate family circumstances, often to ensure a comfortable death. A former patient is now a

JOHN A. PATTERSON MD, MSPH, FAAFP

Dr Patterson chairs the Lexington Medical

Senator Alvarado earned his bachelor's degree in biology from Loma Linda University (California) in 1990, and then went on to receive his Doctorate in Medicine in 1994. He completed his medical residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Kentucky in 1998. Society's Physician Wellness Commission and is certified in Physician Coaching. He is on the family practice faculty UK College of Medicine and teaches nationally for Saybrook School of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences (San Francisco) and the Center for Mind Body Medicine (Washington, DC). After 30 years in private family practice in Irvine KY, he now operates the Mind Body Studio in Lexington, where he offers integrative mind-body medicine consultations specializing in mindfulness-based approaches to stress-related chronic conditions and burnout prevention for helping professionals. He can be reached through his website at www.mindbodystudio.org